Friday, February 12, 2010

Seattle Girl Beaten For Acting White?



It was reported that the 15 year-old girl being beaten in this video, while security guards standby and watch, had run afoul of her attackers by having nice things and 'acting White'. The behavior of the guards, at minimum, shows a disconnect to violence and the harm being done. They make no attempt to shield the victim from her attacker, and assume no defensive posture to protect her. Very sad. This video stands in evidence to the law suit discussed in a previous post Black-on-Black Racism: Part II (here).

James C. Collier

READ MOST RECENT POSTS AT ACTING WHITE...

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20 comments:

Sean said...

The security guards are trained NOT to intervene. The do not have weapons or skills, and are not police. There are real liability issues.

Seattle Metro (the operator of the buses) contracts with the private security firm and there is talk here in Seattle of allowing security guards to intervene. Not sure how that will work, and I can imagine scenarios where that will go terribly wrong.

That being said, to stand by and do nothing is inhuman.

The sad fact is, this sort of group beating in Seattle is not rare. A friend just witnessed one a few months ago, a local street musician was beaten to death a year or so ago, and there are cases that never make the news.

I find it frustrating beyond words that black on black violence is handled with a proverbial shrug.

Anonymous said...

Hmm, I was going to send you this video. If she yelled the n-word during the beating, does that make it a hate crime?

I wouldn't be too hard on the guards. They're not allowed to intervene. They would lose their jobs. Strange thing - their job is to "observe and report", but there is a camera right there that does the same thing? I think the real purpose is to provide an illusion of security to discourage this kind of thing, without any of the issues that would be raised by actually stopping it once it starts.

What we should really be asking is what the hell kind of environment has this girl lived in that she thinks this behavior is acceptable? If we need to rely on Paul Blart to protect us from degenerates everywhere we go, all is already lost.

ronnie brown said...

rather than to focus on the callousness of the "guards" watching a 15 year old girl gettin' beat down, we should be putting a greater emphasis on the symptoms of internalized self-loathing...which is what the phrase "acting white" represents...

Anonymous said...

I don't really think that "acting white" is a term of self-loathing. I think it's defensive posturing and aggrandizement of a culture that allows its adherents to wallow in self-pity and shirk any responsibility for their situation. Remember, "acting white" is used a pejorative for people who are striving for success. It's not generally used as a compliment.

ogunsiron said...

The day judges allow security guards or adults in general (teachers, etc)to use *reasonable* violence against young thugs is the day things will start to change. In the meantime this security guard will NOT touch a hair of the young thugs because they and their company will lose in court.

ronnie brown said...

anonymous, i'm very aware of term "acting white" being used as a pejorative...my concern is for the black child with such a lack of self-esteem he or she has equated achievement and success as "acting white"...this is an expression that springs from a child WHO IS ALREADY BROKEN IN SPIRIT...he or she has been convinced that people of his ethnicity have been relegated to the bottom...and the bottom they will stay; and white people are firmly established at the top for time and eternity, hence the black child who strives for success is obviously "acting above his or hers "designated station"...thus they are "acting white"...i would agree that it is defensive posturing...the one who is self-loathing is going to be the aggressor simply out of fear of his "lack" being exposed.

sungod said...

okay i know itz not a joking matter but ya gurl got beat the *bleep* down lol anyway enuf ridicule. I have read the former comments and i can somewhat agree to the point of the guards not intervening. Personally i would have but u neva know what kats have in their possession and what is seemingly an open can of a-whoopin can turn deadly in an instant. I am mad that no one helped this gurl i am sure someone knew the assailant. Clearly she had the upper hand and there was no need for further beating esp. kickin a chic damn das gangsta...from a gurl no else where have the youth gone.

buster21 said...

I always liked Spike Lee's definition of racism. As I recall he said that we all have prejudices, but racism is a system of power put in place to act on those prejudices. So I'm not sure if this terrible beating applies, but the school case certainly does.

sungod said...

dont know how this comment slipped passed da god @ anonymous "acting white" is nuthin more than blacks fantasizing over Ofays suggesting that they are better. It is sub conscious degrading and attacks the psyche of many Afrikan-n-Amerikkka. I do remember being brainwashed myself believing that shay whitey was better than me as the author of this blog said "Mea Culpa"!!!!!

boomer babe said...

Was that GIRLS fighting? I cant believe how SOFT MEN ARE TODAY! if this was 10 years ago, the men would have grabbed them and told them to 'knock it off' Alas, it just shows that no one even CARES about black teenage girls--I believe its subconscious because of the music--i may be wrong though

Anonymous said...

ronnie brown- wrong! Acting white is not self loathing.. I lived in the suburbs for most of my life. When I would go back to the city and visit my black family- they would say- why do you act like that? You act WHITE! They made plenty of jokes! From the way I talked to the way I dressed, I got cracked on. So, I believe this story 100%. She probably did get beat up for "acting white." In my situation, I never thought I was better then my black family that lived in the city. If anything I wanted acceptance from them. But they refused to give it to me. Only cracking jokes all of the time. I didn't understand at the time what "acting white" meant. Later on I realized it was because I wasn't infused with the hip hop culture and I went to a challenging school. So, I tried to fit in. But it was never good enough. I always had to prove my blackness to them. So, its sad that the some of the black community can't accept other educated non hip hop black folks for who they are.

ronnie brown said...

anon, please read my previous posts...the self-loathing i was speaking of are the individuals who accuse others of "acting white"...it is an expression i believe, of their own brokenness..."Blackness" is not something that has to be proven or established...Cracking jokes on you was nothing more than a shield to hide their own hurt, their perceived rejection of them by YOU...of what they THINK you assume of them...never assume that "some in the Black community can't accept other educated non hip-hop Black folk"...you don't think they don't want the education, the advantages you have??...your brethren are convinced that those opportunities aren't for them...and in their frustration they lash out at those who do have it...Hip-Hop is not the problem, it's your perspective...sure, you were hurt; but if you know why, you can start viewing your people through the lens of sympathy and compassion rather than bitterness.

Anonymous said...

Ronni-brown,

thank you for the response. I reread your post and I apologize for the mix up. I did not read it correctly. I understand now.

"your brethren are convinced that those opportunities aren't for them"

I agree, they have the opportunities but refuse to go for it. They think it is not "cool" to sound educated.
They give each other props for being a rebel. I could go on and on.


"Hip-Hop is not the problem, it's your perspective"

Do you truly believe this? You don't think that Hip-Hop/Rap has influenced the African American youth in a negative way? It is negative and positive. But what about the 1990's? Tupac, Biggie, Jay-z, Wu-Tang,Dr. Dre, Snoop Dog? All of the violence, all of the weed, all of the women... the message they sent out? All of the followers they had that worshipped them like Gods?

ronnie brown said...

Anon, the same self-loathing that would accuse you of "acting white" is the same self-loathing that causes a person to view life through the lens of low expecations...most people don't REFUSE opportunities; more than likely they may have doubts about whether they can succeed...there is such a thing as a fear of success/failure...generally if you're afraid, you stick with what you know...you can't look at this thing on a surface level...fear creates a herd mentality...Not "cool" to sound educated?...don't believe the hype!...that's just more bravado to mask the fear of failure, the fear of having to leave familiar surroundings, associations, the fear of risk, competition, etc.

Hip-Hop is a two-edged sword...It gave Black youth culture a freedom of expression that had previously been discouraged...and that freedom has been picked up by youth all over the globe...unfortunately, that same freedom opened the door to a lot of unsavory elements as well...the same door that can let the cool breeze in the house, can also let the flies in!...Hip-Hop didn't have a screen door to keep out the negative elements.

But think about this...American popular culture has just as many unsavory elements that influence society...you don't think white kids aren't influenced by the drug, gangster life, debasement of women of the movies and TV they make?...check the history...don't be browbeat into holding black people to a higher standard than you do white folks...

Anonymous said...

Well, thank you very much for enlightening me on the subject. Great argument. We have an inferiority complex.

I am the type of person that looks at tough love as a great form of discipline. When it comes to African Americans, I think we should be tough. I have compassion and sympathy for my people, but I believe we make a lot of excuses and blame too much. What is it going to take for change? I know it won't happen overnight, but all of the tools are there so when are we going to start using them? Opportunities surround us everywhere.

Hip hop is a two-edged sword. I agree with you on that. And like you said, white kids are influenced by the movies and tv they make, but I feel like African Americans should try harder just because of all the history behind us. We fought so hard to get here and it seems like we are just throwing opportunities right out the window. Now that we know the reasons why we are struggling to succeed, what are we going to do to fix it? I just feel like we should be doing so much more and its frustrating.



We are stuck in a rut.

ronnie brown said...

anon, it won't happen overnight; seven generations of white supremacy/racism have given some of us an inferiority complex, some of us are broken...but consider this, we are only 147 years removed from chattel slavery, 45 years from receiving the simple right to vote!...no group in this country has had to overcome the obstacles we have...that's why every other ethnic group or special interest uses our struggle as an example...look "tough love" is necessary in certain cases, but don't let your frustration turn you into a sniper shootin' from an ivory tower...compassion is not weakness; without it, tough love turns into abuse...

Anonymous said...

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100628/ap_on_re_us/us_the100_percenters_abridged

Interesting! I think this approach will work. :))
Ronnie, I thought you would like this article.. let me know what you think.

ronnie brown said...

anon, this is exactly what i'm talkin' about...truth be told, there are thousands of stories just like this that happen outside the media spotlight. With media, there is a fine line between truth and propaganda...Most news outlets follow a "if it bleeds, it leads" kind of approach...murder and mayhem sells, uplift doesn't...and Black folks have to fight everyday to not let ourselves be stigmatized by media...and be influenced by that by that very same stigmatization.

Anonymous said...

Hey Ronnie, I just want to thank you for taking the time to explain everything to me- I really appreciate it. And I want to thank James C. Collier for creating this blog. I'll admit, I was bitter before, but the more I read this blog and the more I converse with other people on the subject, I realize that my views are not always correct or fair. So, thank you... I really enjoy coming to this blog everyday and reading about different subject and engaging in debates with other people only to learn something new!

ronnie brown said...

anon, thank you for being willing to broaden your understanding...you will be able to be an instrument of wisdom and enlightenment to that young brother or sister who has gone through similiar circumstances...knowledge really is power...

be well,
Ronnie
Inglewood, Ca